Welcome to the future of fashion. One revolutionary company has found a way to make buying and selling clothes much, much more affordable, sustainable, and ethical than ever before. That’s because their clothes are available to buy for your carefully curated Instagram selfies, not your actual wardrobe. Read on to find out more about DigitalX and how they’re changing the industry.

As futuristic as it sounds, it’s actually available to use right now. Instead of having to use real tangible materials to make new and exciting fashion, you can use state-of-the-art technology. You’d simply need to send a chosen photo to the team at DressX, buy the design of your choice, and wait for them to digitally photoshop the garment on your body. Once it’s been done to a high degree, they’ll send you back the altered picture. It’s perfect for when you want to trade out your well-worn clothes for something new and fresh on your Instagram feed.

Images: DressX (left and right)

And there are a lot of real-world benefits to shopping this way. First of all, there’s the price. Their clothes range from affordable high street prices to prices in the three digits, but you’ll still be paying a fraction of the cost if the item had been made IRL. Somebody on Red carpet-worthy gowns or space-age styles that would have ordinarily priced a lot of people out can be in reach of a whole new demographic. The setback? Only your avatar can wear it.

But that suits a lot of people just fine. With digital clothing, you don’t have to worry about caring for an item, storing it appropriately, or contributing to unbiodegradable waste. You don’t have the pressure of having to purchase from ethical companies. And you can still buy the latest styles or experiment with fashion, without the guilt.

DressX have also started collaborating with augmented reality creators for special collections. One of their digital creators, called Doddz, asks “If [the clothes are] only going to be used as part of your digital presence, then why not use digital clothing?” and he has a point. 70% of the population in the United States have social media accounts, and in the UK nearly one in 10 shoppers admitted to having bought an item of clothing only to put it up on social media once. So as bizarre as it might seem to some people, there is definitely a market for it. So, what do you think? Are digital clothes the future of fashion?