Everyone’s goal in life is to retire early, right? Wrong! Like all good things, there is a dark side. Retiring isn’t always about leisurely walks on the beach and early morning tee times. Instead of obsessing over retiring, let’s take a look at five convincing reasons why you should keep working.

You’ll Make More Money

Of course, the longer you work, the more money you’ll make. But working just an extra six months longer than your original retirement date will boost your Social Security benefit. This, in turn, could increase your retirement income as if you had saved an additional one percent per year for 30 years before ending work.

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Work To Keep The Doctor Away

Working helps to keep you healthy! Even if you’re working part-time, or from home, studies have shown that the longer the work, the less likely you are to have certain disabilities that are common among retirees. Keeping your mind sharp by performing any work can help increase your longevity.

Stanford News

Your Relationships Will Change

Strong friendships form in the workplace. If the thought of leaving your work friends seems lonely, you might want to put off your retirement for a little longer. Not to mention, retiring means spending more time with your spouse, which may put different stresses on your relationship if you aren’t accustomed to being together 24/7.

Time

The Health Insurance Factor

If you plan to retire before age 65, then you won’t be eligible for Medicare which means you could have to pay more than you’re used to for health insurance. If you have affordable health insurance through work, it may be worth it to stick around a little longer to reap the benefits of decent healthcare.

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Share Your Knowledge By Being A Mentor

Working will give you the chance to share your knowledge with a younger generation. You’ve worked so hard to get to retirement, and it’s your duty to pass down what you’ve learned throughout the years. Becoming a mentor at work is a great way to feel a sense of pride and purpose before wrapping up your career.

University of Virginia