Colgate Beef Lasagna

Colgate Beef Lasagna

Colgate, the toothpaste manufacturer, entered the food market in 1982, but it did not fare well. It was most likely due to the fact that the brand name has become synonymous with dental fluoride.

Colgate Beef Lasagna

Customers were unimpressed with the beef lasagne, claiming that it tasted just like Colgate toothpaste. This weak market launch also resulted in lower sales of their toothpaste. It sounds like Colgate seriously injured its brand by trying to expand into other markets.

Chocolate Chip Pancake

This is one of the strangest pancake mixes ever. In 2016, Jimmy Dean debuted this dish. It was made out of sausage links covered in chocolate chips and served on a stick. The very combination turns our stomachs just to write about.

Chocolate Chip Pancake

It’s hardly surprising that customers didn’t love these chocolate chip pancakes. It’s simple to see why this recipe was abandoned after a short time. It’s completely disgusting and we certainly hope that no one ever attempts anything like it again.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7

Because Samsung is a worldwide brand, it is constantly in the headlines when one of its products fails to please. This was the situation with Samsung’s flagship phone for 2017, the Galaxy Note 7. It could have been good news, but unfortunately, a case of fires and explosions prevented that.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7

Following many reports of overheating and exploding batteries, the business recalled up to 2.5 million phones. This phone’s manufacture was halted after less than a year. Perhaps Samsung should invest in a team to test their phones for a while before releasing them.

Pepsi Blue

In order to compete, Pepsi introduced a new product named Pepsi Blue in 2002. Pepsi Blue was created to compete with Vanilla Coke, but it was a commercial failure. Honestly, Vanilla Coke didn’t perform so well either, but that’s a story for another time.

Pepsi Blue

Despite extensive advertising, Pepsi’s flavor was the primary cause of its failure. Consumers said it tasted like cotton candy with a berry aftertaste, despite being marketed as a berry cola fusion drink.

Google Glass

Google Glass, like hoverboards, was a device that many believed would be around for a long time. Surprisingly, Google Glass did not make a significant impact on the market. They had a lot of potential with the product but weren’t able to bring it home.

Google Glass

This was due to a variety of factors, the most significant of which being the fact that it did not provide much value to customers when its price was regarded as extremely high. It cost $1500 but did not deliver good value for money. There were also several questions regarding privacy and safety.

Parfum Bic

Bic developed a perfume in 1989, another unsuccessful marketing venture. Everything about the product’s branding was excellent, from the package to the reasonable pricing. Of course, no matter how cheap or well-marketed the perfume was, the thing everyone cared most about was the scent.

Parfum Bic

Consumers, however, were unimpressed with the scent, and Bic was forced to discontinue production after just one year. They suffered an estimated $11 million loss. It just goes to show that companies should focus on what they do well instead of expanding to other types of products.

Rejuvenique Face Mask

The Rejuvenique face mask, a toning facial mask, was introduced in 1999 but did not stay long on the market. The mask’s function was to tighten facial muscles, although the manner it utilized was controversial.

Rejuvenique Face Mask

Shock treatment was used to strengthen the facial muscles. This proved to be quite unpleasant for users, bordering on nightmare-like. It wasn’t long before manufacturing was halted. It’s probably for the best; this looks and sounds more like a torture device than anything else.

Heinz EZ Squirt Ketchup

Heinz decided it would be a good idea to make their ketchup more kid-friendly in the year 2000. To do this, they introduced three additional colors: purple, green, and teal. It might have sounded good in the corporate room, but in practice it was just gross.

Heinz EZ Squirt Ketchup

It turns out that putting green, purple, and teal ketchup on fries wasn’t as enticing as Heinz had hoped. After six years of production, EZ Squirt-colored ketchup was discontinued in 2006. We really hope that it never comes back in any form.

Frito-Lay Wow! Chips

Frito-Lay began manufacturing Wow! in 1998. Wow! was a fat-free potato chip that enabled people to avoid fat while eating potato chips. Unlike many of the goods on this list, Wow! was a big hit right away, with Frito-Lay generating up to $400 million in sales.

Frito-Lay Wow! Chips

However, it was revealed that Wow! included Olestra, a fat replacement. Wow! lost popularity as a result of the gastrointestinal troubles and abdominal pains induced by Olestra. The ingredients simply didn’t line up well together and unfortunately, many fans of the chips needed medical treatment.

Google+

Google+, a social network platform, was launched in 2011 by the technological behemoth Google. Google+, like many other social networks introduced at the time, was designed to compete with Facebook. This was not the case, as Google+ fell short of expectations.

Google+

There were also several controversies about its use. The platform’s lackluster success prompted a major revamp four years later, in 2015.

New Coke

When huge businesses like Coca-Cola encounter product failure, it speaks a lot about the unpredictability of business. In 1985, Coca-Cola launched a proposal to reformulate Coke under the brand New Coke. New Coke performed admirably in a $4 million countrywide taste test.

New Coke

It was a different story once it was released since the response was overwhelmingly negative. The corporation was forced to return to the old formula, rebranding it as Coca-Cola Classic.

E.T The Extra-Terrestrial

Atari won the game rights to the big office blockbuster E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial in 1982. They paid roughly $20 million to get these rights, hoping that the game, like the film, would be a smash blockbuster.

E.T The Extra-Terrestrial

This was not the case, since E.T. was one of the greatest commercial flops in gaming history. Atari created 4 million cartridges, 2.5 million of which ended up in a landfill. Talk about a serious waste of space.

Microsoft Zune

Microsoft’s Zune was a portable media player designed to compete with Apple’s iPod. The Zune, on the other hand, did not create a great impression, and production was finally halted. One of the reasons behind Microsoft Zune’s failure was its late release.

Microsoft Zune

The Zune was introduced in 2006, five years after the iPod. It also lacked features that distinguished it from the iPod, and its marketing was subpar. It’s no wonder that the Zune went under so quickly.

Mars Need Moms

Mars Need Moms, the lone film on the list, is widely regarded as the biggest cinematic flop of 2011. The animated picture was shot in 3D and cost $150 million to produce, with an additional $50 million spent on marketing.

Mars Need Moms

Frustrating is an understatement given the film’s domestic box office result, as it earned just $6.9 million in its first weekend, a minuscule proportion of the money invested. But, honestly, did they really think that this was a good concept for moviegoers?

Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino

Starbucks debuted the unicorn frappuccino on their Instagram accounts, which sparked a lot of enthusiasm because it checked all the aesthetic requirements. Everyone was very excited to try this purple and blue drink since it seemed so adorable. However, the flavor didn’t match up with the looks.

Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino

The aesthetics and excitement did not match the flavor, which was labeled as “extremely fake” by some. Many Starbucks consumers were dissatisfied as a result of this. People may enjoy their elaborate concoctions, but there is still a line between totally artificial and some remaining taste of coffee.

Satisfries

Burger King attempted to encourage healthy eating with satisfries, but it failed. Satisfries, which were introduced in 2013 as an alternative to regular fries, had fewer calories but also fewer fries. So, it doesn’t seem like Burger King really understands its audience.

Satisfries

Customers were underwhelmed by the new french fries, despite their clear health benefits. Burger King finally discontinued satisfries and returned to their standard recipe. That was probably best for everyone, including their fans.

Cheetos Lip Balm

This concept is comparable to the one underlying the Colgate Beef Lasagna, which was previously addressed. The only difference is that the lip balm in this case genuinely tasted like Cheetos and was not a fiction of the imagination.

Cheetos Lip Balm

Consumers did not appear to require a Cheetos-flavored lip balm, since this product did not fare well on the market. We can understand people’s hesitation since Cheetos has no knowledge of the beauty industry and who knows how it might have tasted.

Hoverboards

When hoverboards were introduced in 2015, many people predicted that they would be popular for a long time. This was not the case, as the dangers of this thrilling toy proved to be larger than its benefits.

Hoverboards

Hoverboard fires were prevalent due to bursting batteries (induced by extended charging or usage), and these electric skateboards were quickly phased out. Considering how dangerous they proved to be for owners, it’s unfortunate that they didn’t take them off the market sooner.

Windows Vista

Microsoft’s Windows Vista operating system, introduced in 2007, was a flop, with people mainly disliking it. The reasons for Windows Vista’s failure include poor driver support, worries about security features, time-consuming product activation, and the overall performance of the program. Many consider it to be Microsoft’s worst operating system ever.

Windows Vista

And Windows has a long line of operating system failures. So it’s saying a lot to declare that Windows Vista is the absolute worst of the bunch. Like every tech company, Windows has certainly gone through some serious growing pains with updates.

Delorean Dmc-12

The Delorean DMC-12, the only automobile produced by the Delorean Motor Company, garnered renown but not financial success. The automobile, which was manufactured in 1981, appeared as a time machine in the film Back to the Future.

Delorean Dmc-12

Despite being a movie property, the automobile did not fare well on the market because to a lack of customer interest, safety concerns, and performance difficulties. After the firm went bankrupt in 1984, production of the Delorean Dmc-12 was halted.

Blak

Blak, a Coca-Cola product released in 2006, was a blend of cola and coffee. Blak was an effort to mix Coke’s signature flavor with coffee in order to provide early risers with a much-needed caffeine boost. Blak’s flavor, on the other hand, did not go down well with many customers.

Blak

It was difficult to discern what it truly tasted like, and the flavor was subpar. Caffeine was also found to be excessive, and the product was eventually withdrawn. Coca-Cola fiends may love their caffeine, but it is very possible to go too far when flavoring your drink.

Gerber Singles

Gerber produced a product line in 1974 that, if it had worked, would have been labeled brilliant. Gerber, the baby-food tycoon, moved into the manufacture of “baby-food” for adults. Even with the branding, we can already see the problems that would lie ahead for them.

Gerber Singles

Gerber Singles were ready-to-eat meals in a jar that came in a variety of tastes such as Blueberry Delight, Beef Burgundy, and Mediterranean Vegetables. Adults preferred to consume grownup food, and Gerber Singles flopped on the market.

Nokia N-Gage

In 2003, many individuals were playing games on their smartphones. Nokia integrated gaming and phones with the Nokia N-Gage in an attempt to improve the gaming experience. The Nokia N-Gage was not the success they had hoped for, as it was met with a lukewarm welcome when it was released.

Nokia N-Gage

The phone’s form drew some eyebrows, and it was dubbed the “taco phone.” The Nokia N-Gage was a commercial disaster, with just 1.8 million of the 6 million phones sold. We wonder what they did with all of the remaining, unsold phones?

McDonald’s Arch Deluxe

As McDonald’s discovered in 1996, a novel recipe is not necessarily the greatest method to get new consumers. The Arch Deluxe was launched in order to extend the target market to include adults, and the mustard-mayonnaise sauce is supposed to accomplish the trick.

McDonald’s Arch Deluxe

Despite spending $100 million on an advertising campaign, this idea did not pan out. This product’s marketing effort is one of the most costly failures of all time. Just think of all of the other ways that money might have been spent. Coming up with a better burger, perhaps?

Brewed Coffee In A Box

Maxwell House introduced pre-brewed coffee in a cardboard box to the market in 1990. Despite the fact that this was a wonderful concept that may have created a cold coffee craze, Maxwell House passed up the chance.

Brewed Coffee In A Box

Instead, they advised customers to heat their coffee before drinking it. This rendered their product’s purpose moot, and they were forced to halt production within a short period of time. Talk about an enormous waste of time and money!

Clippy

Prior to voice assistants like Alexa and Siri, there was Clippy, an office helper. Clippy, created by Microsoft in the 1990s, is widely regarded as one of the worst user interfaces ever. Everything about it was utterly annoying.

Clippy

Clippy’s biggest flaw was that it always managed to irritate consumers. It was designed to appear anytime it sensed people needed assistance, but its leering eyes did not endear it to many users. Much like the snowman Olaf from Disney’s Frozen.

Vio, Coca Cola

Coca-Cola attempted to enter the dairy sector with Vio in 2009. This drink comes in brightly colored bottles that were highly appealing. Vio had all the makings of a tremendous hit, with flavors including Very Berry, Peach Mango, Exotic, Citrus Burst, and Tropical Colada.

Vio, Coca Cola

The taste, on the other hand, was not well received by customers, who disliked the mix of flavored milk and carbonated water. Even just writing the words makes us gag a little bit. Sounds completely disgusting, right?

Cosmopolitan Yogurt

Cosmopolitan, well known for its lifestyle magazine, held influence throughout the 2000s, launched a venture into the culinary market in 1999. Cosmopolitan Yogurt was successful within its target groups but failed to make a significant inroad into the larger market.

Cosmopolitan Yogurt

As a result, it flopped on the market, and production was halted after only 18 months. It’s safe to say that the yogurt didn’t sell as well as the news. And their target audience must not be very large, either.

Four Loko

Drink Four Brewing Company’s Four Loko was introduced in 2005. Four Loko was a caffeine-laced alcoholic beverage. The issue with this drink was not its flavor, but its impact on users’ health. It was eventually banned in multiple states.

Four Loko

There have always been legal, ethical, and health problems, and in 2011, the FDA designated it a public health risk. In 2016, production was eventually halted. It’s been reintroduced sans caffeine and with marketing towards adults. The original product may have failed, but it is now doing well.

Segway FT

Segway FT, a two-wheeled self-balancing conveyance, was introduced by Segway in 2001. Despite the fact that it was expected to be a market success, the Segway FT was a flop. Not to mention some of the flops of people falling off.

Segway FT

This was due in part to its high price, as well as the fact that it was mainly superfluous for customers. Less than 10,000 Segway FT units were sold in the first two years, a huge drop from experts’ expectations of 10,000 units each week.

Microsoft Bob

Microsoft Bob, another unsuccessful project from Microsoft, was released in 1995. The objective behind this program was to make a more user-friendly software, and the desktop screen included a depiction of a room to that end.

Microsoft Bob

This screen was unsightly and lacked visual appeal. It was also not as user-friendly as anticipated, and users considered it to be an unmanageable jumble. It was decommissioned in 1996. It had some potential, but all of that potential was completely squandered.

Apple Pippin

Apple released a system named the Apple Pippin in 1995, but it was a flop. In actuality, only 42,000 of the 100,000 units made were sold. Pippin debuted at a period when gaming titans such as PlayStation, Sega, and Nintendo ruled the roost.

Apple Pippin

As a result, it was impossible for this console to disrupt the market. The console’s online browsing and educational functions didn’t improve things. Apple was clearly trying to compete with large companies like Sony and Nintendo, but their game console didn’t hold a candle to anything else.

Nintendo Virtual Boy

The Nintendo Virtual Boy was released in 1995 by Nintendo and was a flop. According to Nintendo, the Virtual Boy was the first virtual reality system. This was not the case, since the parallax effect was exploited to give players the appearance of depth.

Nintendo Virtual Boy

Virtual Boy received a bad response due to its exorbitant pricing, doubtful 3D effect, monochromatic display, and health concerns expressed. In essence, everything that could go wrong did go wrong. Nintendo had banked on their commercial success to sell the Virtual Boy, but they learned they needed to step up their game.

Astro Pants

Lululemon, an athletic wear retailer, did not quite strike the target with Astro Pants. Customers discovered that the trousers were see-through after they purchased them. We just hope that they figured it out before they went out to run their errands or to their cycling class and everyone could see them.

Astro Pants

This did not sit well with many customers, and the consequences for Lululemon were severe. Profits plummeted, they were forced to recall the trousers, and they were also hit with a lawsuit. All of that was enough to ensure that the pants were gone for good.

Breakfast Mates

Everyone knows that milk and cereal go together like a glove. This was the inspiration behind Kellogg’s Breakfast Mates. This product was introduced in 1998, with over $30 million spent on print and television advertisements.

Breakfast Mates

Consumers did not find Breakfast Mates appetizing or convenient, proving that the simplest concepts may not necessarily provide the best outcomes. The taste should have been the priority, but it looks like they didn’t think it through.

Dreamcast

Sega, formerly a gaming behemoth, sought a huge return with the Dreamcast after PlayStation had emerged as the clear leader. The Dreamcast, on the other hand, was not excellent enough to unseat the PlayStation 2, which was the rage at the moment.

Dreamcast

Poor marketing, cost disadvantages, terrible game choices, and poor launch games were only a few of the reasons why the Sega Dreamcast failed. Following the demise of the Dreamcast, Sega became a third-party developer. This was a good change for their company.

Legendary Harley Davidson Cologne

Our is most likely the oddest brand extension on this list. Harley-Davidson, the manufacturer of some of the greatest American motorcycles to date, entered the scent industry in 1990 with the Legendary Harley-Davidson cologne.

Legendary Harley Davidson Cologne

It was a short-lived endeavor since the response was negative, and the firm chose to discontinue its brand expansion initiative. Considering how people think of the brand, they likely wanted the company to concentrate on doing one thing well instead of many things half-baked.

Corfam

Corfam shoes were introduced by the shoemaker DuPont in 1964. Corfam shoes were unlike any other shoes on the market since they were constructed of synthetic leather. This could be the wave of the future, assuming that the future can do it better.

Corfam

The shoes were promoted by DuPont under the idea that synthetic leather was superior to genuine leather. This provided some traction for the shoes, but after a period, there were several complaints about the shoes. Users complained that the shoes were excessively hot for their feet and too stiff.

Coors Rocky Mountain Spring Water

Coors Brewing Company introduced Coors Rocky Mountain Spring Water in 1990 in an effort to expand their non-alcoholic beverage offerings. Many customers were perplexed by the product’s name and label, which were identical to those of Coors Beer.

Coors Rocky Mountain Spring Water

As a result of low sales, Coors Brewing Company was forced to discontinue the manufacturing of Coors Rocky Mountain Spring Water in 1997. It’s too bad that people weren’t ready for it, but maybe Coors should just stick to beer from now on.

Nw-Hd1 Audio Player

Sony produced the Nw-Hd1 Audio Player. When it was first released in 2004, one of its main advantages was portability, as it was the smallest audio player at the time. Seems like something that everyone would be a big fan of, right?

Nw-Hd1 Audio Player

Despite this obvious benefit, it proved to be a disastrous product due to format compatibility issues. The player could only play Sony’s ATRAC3 format. As a result, files in formats such as WMA, WAV, and even MP3 could not be played on this audio player.

HP Touchpad

HP released the HP Touchpad in 2011 in an attempt to compete with the iPad. The product failed on the market for a variety of reasons, including bad marketing, lethal leaks, and a terrible name choice.

HP Touchpad

As a result, it was unable to live up to expectations as the tablet to rival Apple’s iPad. The HP Touchpad was only on the market for 49 days, with just 20,000 units sold. Seems like a waste of everyone’s time.

Bic for Her

Women have been scribbling using a man’s pen for many years. They never really understood why it felt awkward or why it was so difficult to get anything done in spite of all of their writing practice. Fortunately, in 2012, Bic introduced a product for ladies that they didn’t even realize they needed: “woman pens.”

Bic for Her

We’re being absolutely sarcastic if you couldn’t tell by now. Bic for Her pens were a failure because the manufacturer made some significant assumptions about the female demographic. They’re meaningless gendered pens that have been derided since they first debuted on store shelves.

Apple Newton

The Newton was the first device to integrate handwriting recognition, and it was part of Apple’s Newton family of personal digital assistants (PDAs). They began working on the platform in 1987, and it was released six years later, in 1993.

Apple Newton

Although the gadget was deemed technologically revolutionary at the time of its release, it was discontinued only five years later owing to a variety of circumstances, including issues with the handwriting recognition feature. It didn’t help that Apple charged such a hefty price for it.

CueCat Barcode Scanner

The CueCat was developed by Digital Convergence Corporation and introduced in the late 1990s. Needless to say, it was a very costly disaster. It was designed to act as a link between the worlds of print media and the internet. Customers may surf websites by scanning specifically designated bar codes after connecting the gadget to a PC.

CueCat Barcode Scanner

While it’s a lovely idea, we’re not sure how this is much more convenient than putting a URL into the browser. As one can assume, this device baffled everyone, and it was eventually withdrawn when it was declared ineffective.

Crystal Pepsi

PepsiCo released a new product named “Crystal Pepsi” in 1992, which was a caffeine-free clear alternative to regular colas. Crystal Pepsi, launched in response to customer concerns about purity, failed poorly for a variety of reasons, including taste.

Crystal Pepsi

PepsiCo may have boasted that their new beverage tasted like “Pepsi,” but it wasn’t quite as sugary. Without the lime flavor, it tasted more like Sprite. David C. Novak, the developer of Crystal Pepsi, subsequently confessed that “it would have been lovely if I’d made sure the product tasted well.”

Eons.com

In 2006, a new social networking site called Eons was created for members aged 50 and over, however, the age limit was eventually reduced to 40 in 2008. While the platform, which was essentially MySpace for baby boomers, had an age limit for a purpose, it also kept the site from being generally popular.

Eons.com

Given that, it was unable to get individuals to join up. Having said that, the site never saw a significant increase in traffic. By 2011, it had been purchased by an advertising firm that caters to mature clients.

GM EV1

There’s no disputing that electric vehicles have gained in popularity over the years, which is why the EV1 was such a success with customers and environmentalists when it was released. In 1996, General Motors created the first mass-produced electric vehicle. However, six years after its sale, GM recalled the vehicle, citing liability and spare-parts concerns.

GM EV1

Simply put, this infuriated a lot of people. Nonetheless, we believe GM was ahead of the curve in creating the car. By 2020, the corporation will have laid the groundwork for an all-electric future…

Frito-Lay Lemonade

Frito-Lay lemonade is another unsuccessful PepsiCo invention. Frito-Lay is the most well-known brand of salty snacks in the United States. What do people prefer to eat with a salty snack? Of course, a thirst-quenching beverage. This lemonade, which was introduced in 1998, may have appeared to be a reasonable brand expansion at first, but the soft drink was a complete flop.

Frito-Lay Lemonade

Even while lemonade is delicious, it wouldn’t have been enough to satisfy people’s thirst after consuming the company’s salty appetizers. In other words, from the consumer’s standpoint, this sweet drink bore no resemblance to other Frito-Lay products.

Google Lively

It was the year 2008, and the digital world known as “Second Life” was prospering! Google, of course, got in on the fun and decided to build its own variant named “Lively.” Avatars were created for users to engage in a three-dimensional virtual environment.

Google Lively

While it seemed like a good concept at the time, Lively was abandoned just a few months later in December 2008 for a variety of reasons, including server issues and slowness. Hopefully, they’ve learned their lesson about the number of servers they need.

Hannah Montana Cherries

From High School Musical cucumbers to Toy Story apples, Disney is infamous for slapping its logo on just about everything and everything. After Hannah Montana became a huge hit, it wasn’t unexpected to see that Disney had merchandised hundreds of things based on the show.

Hannah Montana Cherries

Hannah Montana cherries, on the other hand, may not have been their brightest or most fitting idea. The Washington Post proposed a Hannah Montana banana, but Disney rejected this brilliant and creative market concept in favor of cherries. Needless to say, folks weren’t particularly enthusiastic about this one…

Bringing a new product to market has repeatedly been shown to be one of the most challenging areas of business. Consumers are either unprepared for such items or just do not want them. Most fledgling businesses and corporate behemoths have encountered product failure at some time. In this post, we’ll look at unsuccessful products that firms now wish they hadn’t made. Some of these goods are very entertaining, while others are just needless.